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EV Charging Firms Push Back Against Texas Plan to Mandate Tesla Standard

Charging companies deem the state’s proposed EV mandate as “premature”, calling for more time to test and adapt to Tesla’s connectors. A coalition of electric vehicle (EV) charging companies, which

EV Charging Firms Push Back Against Texas Plan to Mandate Tesla Standard
  • PublishedJuly 2, 2023

Charging companies deem the state’s proposed EV mandate as “premature”, calling for more time to test and adapt to Tesla’s connectors.

A coalition of electric vehicle (EV) charging companies, which includes ChargePoint Holdings and manufacturer ABB, along with a clean energy association, is objecting to a plan from the state of Texas to mandate Tesla’s charging standard in new charging stations, citing the move as “premature”.

Texas recently announced plans to mandate EV charging stations to incorporate both Tesla’s North American Charging Standard (NACS) and the rival Combined Charging Standard (CCS) technology. This move is a requirement to qualify for a state program aimed at electrifying highways using federal funds.

Following Texas’ lead, Washington state also announced similar plans. The international standards organization, SAE International, added fuel to the fire by stating it aims to standardize Tesla’s charging connector within the next six months.

In a letter sent to the chairman of the Texas Transportation Commission, the group of charging companies expressed their concerns, stating that Texas’ plan “risks the successful deployment” of the initial phase of federal funding. The group emphasized the need for more time to standardize, test, and certify the safety and interoperability of Tesla’s connectors across the industry.

A source close to the matter revealed that these organizations are considering reaching out to the federal government to discuss the issue further.

Tesla, currently the leading EV maker in the U.S., has experienced a series of successes with its charging technology recently. Automakers such as Ford Motor, General Motors, and Rivian Automotive have announced they will adopt the NACS. Their decisions were based on concerns over potential customer losses if they only offered the CCS.

Approximately 60% of all fast chargers in the U.S. are Tesla’s Superchargers, according to data from the U.S. Department of Energy. These recent agreements will permit non-Tesla EV owners to use the company’s vast charging network.

However, questions persist regarding the potential compatibility issues between the two charging standards and the financial implications of having both standards in the market for both vendors and customers.

The charging companies argue that the adaptation of NACS connectors necessitates several changes, including extending the cable length and ensuring suitable temperature ranges. Furthermore, specific parts require certification, as mentioned in the letter.

The companies also underscored the necessity for a robust supply chain for NACS cables and connectors that meet the requirements.

Written By
Michael Shield

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